Drama Games for Kids

Whoosh!

Whoosh

Type:  Warm-Up.

Procedure: 

  • Everybody stands in a circle.
  • Start with one person, who waves both hands to his/her neighbor, saying `Whoosh`.
  • The next person passes the Whoosh to his neighbor, and that way the Whoosh is passed around the circle.
  • There’s 4 other sounds/movements that can be made:
  • Whoa!:  indicated by saying “whoa”, and holding up both hands in a stop motion. A “Whoa” changes the direction of the Whoosh.
  • “Zap”: instead of passing the Whoosh to your neighbor, it gets zapped to the person you point to with your hands clapped together. The receiver continues with either a Whoosh to his neighbor, or another Zap to another person. A “Whoa” after a Zap returns to the Zapper.
  • “Groooooooovelicious`: for this one the whole group bends down and up again in a kinda groovy way, all saying Groooooooovelicious. Afterwards, the person who started the Groovelicious sets the Whoosh in motion again, in any direction.
  • “Freakout”: indicated by waving both hands in the air. Everybody starts screaming and moves to the center of the circle. When everybody`s freaked out a new circle is formed, and the starter of the Freakout sets the Whoosh in motion again.

Variations:

  • You can invent other sounds and gestures.
  • Begin an elimination mode in which kids that mess up must sit down, till there’s only two people left standing.


Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by Beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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“Lap, Lap, Clap, Snap!”

Type:  Warm-up.

Name Game DramaPurpose:

  • Practice knowing everyone’s names
  • Rhythm Recognition

Procedure:

  • Sit on the floor in a big circle.
  • One person starts the action: “Lap, Lap, Clap, Snap.”  This is done by patting one’s legs with both hands, clapping in front of you, and then snapping with both hands. Do it several times until everyone in the circle is comfortable with the rhythm.
  • The leader then calls out the name of a person in the “snap,” and that person has to call out a different name on the next snap, etc.
  • Any time the rhythm is broken, the person who broke the rhythm is out. The person sitting next to the one who missed should start the rhythm again. Repeat it several times until everyone is comfortable with it, and on “snap” calls out a name, etc.
  • When everyone gets comfortable with the game, increase the fun by speeding up the rhythm.

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by Beat Press, a new publisher of musicals for kids to perform.

 

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Exploring the Space

Kids Exploring SpaceType: Ensemble Building, Warm-Up

Purpose:

  • To get students familiar with their environment
  • To get students to work together as a group

Materials:

A big enough space for the entire class to walk around comfortably.

Procedure: 

  • Ask the students to spread across the room.
  • Tell them when you tell them to they will start walking around the space.
  • As they walk they should try to cover the space, making sure that they are evenly spread across the floor.
  • They should be aware of each other but should not speak or communicate in any way.
  • They should try to keep in motion at all times but be careful not to touch anyone.
  • Tell them go.
  • As they walk tell them that you will tell them to stop –  at which point they should all freeze.
  • Let them get used to walking and stopping.
  • The cover the space activity has many variations:
  • Students can cover the space in pairs or in threes.
  • You can ask them to vary their speed giving them instructions to walk at a 1 pace to 10 pace, 10 being the fastest.
  • You can ask them once they have stopped to make different shapes with others, for example one square, 2 triangles.
  • You can ask them to form groups based on the colors they are wearing, or the colors of their eyes, or the type of top they are wearing, or the type of music they listen to.
  • These are all silent activities – it is always interesting to see how students figure out how to arrange themselves by taste in music without talking.
  • You can play around with any of these variations that all teach teamwork, awareness and communication,

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by Beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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Introductions and Applause

Kids ApplauseType:  Warm-up.

Purpose:

  • A great way for students to introduce themselves, get a non-frightening taste of being on stage
  • Establish a supportive environment

Procedure: 

  • Either using a real door or an imaginary door (which you create for the students), tell the group each student will come up one by one, walk through the door to “enter” the stage, introduce themselves saying “Hi, my name is _____” and say one interesting thing about themselves (you can add on more to the speech but don’t make it too long or complicated – the point is to give an incredibly easy task).
  • After each introduction, the audience will enthusiastically applaud as the student stays up on stage and takes in the applause.

Note:

  • Do NO coaching here – the point again is to let each student perform their introduction, with no criticism whatsoever. The only thing you CAN coach them on is waiting for the applause – don’t let them run off the stage before they take it in.


Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by Beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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Name Game!

Name Game Drama GameType:  Warm-up.

Purpose:

  • Get to know names and something about each person.
  • Understand how to pantomime and communicate ideas.

Procedure:

  • Gather students in a circle. Have each student say their name and do a gesture for each syllable. The action should be simple and can demonstrate a hobby, interest they have or something that they do everyday. Example: I say “Pam-e-la” and gesture a paddle stroke on each side of my body- one stroke per syllable- to show I like to canoe.
  • Each student says their name individually and demonstrates the gesture and everyone repeats the name and gesture. Repeat the process around the circle until all have shared their name and gesture.
  • If time allows or at another time have those who wish to challenge their memory demonstrate all the names and gestures for everyone.

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

 

 

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Tongue Twisters (The Ultimate List)

Tongue TwistersType:  Warm-up.

Purpose:

  • To concentrate on the use of the articulation muscles and tools in the mouth.
  • To focus on good diction and working the mouth broadly when forming the words.

Here we go:

I thought a thought.
But the thought I thought wasn’t the thought I thought I thought.

One-One was a racehorse.
Two-Two was one, too.
When One-One won one race, Two-Two won one, too.

Say this sharply, say this sweetly,
Say this shortly, say this softly.
Say this sixteen times very quickly.

Rubber Baby Buggy Bumpers! (Repeat. Increase the tempo.)

Silly Sally swiftly shooed seven silly sheep.
The seven silly sheep Silly Sally shooed Shilly-shallied south.
These sheep shouldn’t sleep in a shack; Sheep should sleep in a shed.

Red Bulb Blue Bulb Red Bulb Blue Bulb Red Bulb Blue Bulb

Red Blood Blue Blood

I wish to wish the wish you wish to wish, but if you wish the wish the witch wishes, I won’t wish the wish you wish to wish.

She sells seashells on the seashore.

Mix a box of mixed biscuits with a boxed biscuit mixer.

A proper copper coffee pot.

Toy boat. Toy boat. Toy boat.

Three free throws.

Betty bought butter but the butter was bitter, so Betty bought better butter to make the bitter butter better.

I thought a thought.
But the thought I thought wasn’t the thought I thought I thought.
If the thought I thought I thought had been the thought I thought, I wouldn’t have thought so much.

How much wood could a wood chuck; chuck if a wood chuck could chuck wood.

Comical economists.

Which wristwatches are Swiss wristwatches?

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
Where’s the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?

Sascha sews slightly slashed sheets shut.

She should shun the shinning sun.

The big black back brake broke badly.

The big beautiful blue balloon burst.

A shapeless sash sags slowly.

Smelly shoes and socks shock sisters.

Which wrist watches are Swiss wrist watches?

Dick kicks sticky bricks.

Shave a single shingle thin.

Stick strictly six sticks stumps.

Cinnamon aluminum linoleum.

New York is unanimously universally unique.

Cooks cook cupcakes quickly.

Flora’s freshly fried fish.

A bragging baker baked black bread.

Buy blue blueberry biscuits before bedtime.

She sold six shabby sheared sheep on ship.

The sixth sick sheik’s son slept.

These thousand tricky tongue twisters trip thrillingly off the tongue

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by Beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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One Word Story

Drama Game One Word StoryType:  Warm-up.

Purpose:

  • To work as a team.
  • To work on focus.

Materials:

A big enough space for the entire class to sit in a circle comfortably.

Procedure: 

Players sit in a circle. One person says a single word to begin a story. The person to his left says another word, then the next person says another word, continuing around the circle. The object is to tell a coherent story, one word at a time.

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by Beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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Zip Zap Zop!

Zip Zap Zop

Zip Zap Zop

Type:  Warm-up.

Purpose:

  • To be attentive and work on quick decision making.
  • To work on focus.
  • To raise comfortability of a group.

Materials:

A big enough space for the entire class to stand in a circle comfortably.

Procedure: 

Level One

  • Players stand in a circle.
  • One player, Player A, claps his hands, ending in a pointing position toward the direction of another player. Simultaneously Player A will say the nonsense word “Zip!”
  • Player B repeats this action, clapping and pointing at another player, Player C, while saying “Zap!”
  • Player C repeats this action, pointing at yet again another player while saying the word “Zop!”
  • Players do not need to follow any order can clap and point at any other player they choose, but they should follow the patter of “zip, zap, zop.”

Level Two

  • After the group has gotten sufficiently good at this, you can have them remove the clapping or the saying of the words “zip, zap & zop.”
  • Focus is passed from one person to another by just saying the words or by just clapping, not both.

Level Three

  • When they’re really good at that, you can remove any clapping and words all-together. Focus is passed by making direct eye-contact.

Variations:

  • In some regions, the nonsense word “zop” is often replaced with “zub.”
  • At any point, the players can break from the circle and move freely about the room. They must still maintain the passing of focus from one person to the next.
  • Players can match and copy the manner in which they receive focus. Basically, you imitate the way “zip, zap or zop” was said to you as you pass it on to someone else.
  • This can also be played as an elimination game where everyone who says a word out of order (ie. saying “Zop” instead of “Zip”) or takes too long is eliminated from the game till there is only one left.

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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Bippity Bippity Bop

Type:  Warm-up.

Purpose:

  • To be attentive and work on quick decision making.
  • Learn how to react quickly to an action.
  • To work on focus.
  • To raise comfortability of a group.
  • To get some energy out and HAVE FUN!

Materials:

A big enough space for the entire class to stand in a circle comfortably.

Procedure: 

  1. The entire class stands in a circle and the instructor stands in the middle of the circle.
  2. The first step, the instructor points at someone in the circle and says “bippity bippity bop” as fast as she can. The person being pointed at must say “bop” before she gets to the end of her phrase. If the teacher points to a student and only says “bop” and then the student should not respond. The goal of the teacher is it get the students to not say “bop” fast enough in the first case scenario or to say “bop” in the second.
  3. After this level is well understood by the whole group, it is time to add another dimension. If the teacher points to a student and says “Elephant”, the student must put one hand on his nose and the other arm through the hole his other arm is making (so it looks like an elephant trunk) and then make and elephant noise. The two students to his left and right must use both their arms to make elephant ears.
  4. Another layer, would be if the teacher pointed to a student and said “Jello”, the student being pointed at would have to wiggle around like jello (and make Jello noises) while the students on the left and right would put their arms around the jello to make the bowl.
  5. The final layer, is if the teacher points at a student and says “Godzilla” than the student must stomp in place and roar as if he was Godzilla while the student on the left and right must cower and scream.
  6. If you have time, you can add more in.
  7. Finally, if the class is getting the hang of the game and is able to go faster and faster, then you can add another twist. If one student messes up or does not do his/her action quick enough then they go into the middle of the circle and is now the one pointing out the actions.

Concerns:

  • There are many elements to this game and it could be difficult for some students to remember all of them.
  • The more complex this game gets, the older the student would need to be. I would say this game is for middle-school students and up.
  • This game might need to be altered for some handicap students.
  • Finally, this game could be a little noisy so making sure that you are in a environment that it would not be distracting is important. If the game is to loud, sticking to the quieter pantomimes is a good idea.

Source: 

High school drama teacher, Marilyn Markano, and on the website artswork.asu.edu.

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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