Drama Games for Kids

Hot Spot

Kid SingingType:  Raise-energy.

Purpose:

  • Designed to get people to act quickly, spot patterns and “get out of their heads.”

Materials:

A big enough space for the entire class to stand in a circle comfortably.

Procedure: 

  • Hot Spot begins with the group standing in a circle.
  • A suggestion may be given, but it is not necessary. One person will step into the center of the circle and begin singing a song, preferably a song most of the group already knows.
  • After a few brief lines of song someone must tap out the player in the center and take their place. That player then begins singing a new song somehow inspired by the previous song.
  • That becomes the pattern, as player after player tap into the the center of the circle to sing a song.
  • Players in the surrounding circle may support by singing along, clapping hands, impersonating instruments, etc.
  • The circle also provides support by tapping in to move the exercise along and not leave the singer in the center for too long.

Variations:

  • Made-up Hot Spot:  Like regular hot spot, except the songs are made up on the spot. Players in the circle are still encouraged to sing along.
  • Monologue Hot Spot:  Instead of singing, the person taking the center begins to tell a story. Someone from the circle usually taps in before the story is over.
  • Character Hot Spot:  Instead of singing, the person taking the center begins to tell a story as a character. The person may jump back into the circle at a later time, still acting as the original character.
  • Misheard Lyrics Hot Spot:  Songs are sung with lyrics that are close, but not quite right.

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by Beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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Bippity Bippity Bop

Type:  Warm-up.

Purpose:

  • To be attentive and work on quick decision making.
  • Learn how to react quickly to an action.
  • To work on focus.
  • To raise comfortability of a group.
  • To get some energy out and HAVE FUN!

Materials:

A big enough space for the entire class to stand in a circle comfortably.

Procedure: 

  1. The entire class stands in a circle and the instructor stands in the middle of the circle.
  2. The first step, the instructor points at someone in the circle and says “bippity bippity bop” as fast as she can. The person being pointed at must say “bop” before she gets to the end of her phrase. If the teacher points to a student and only says “bop” and then the student should not respond. The goal of the teacher is it get the students to not say “bop” fast enough in the first case scenario or to say “bop” in the second.
  3. After this level is well understood by the whole group, it is time to add another dimension. If the teacher points to a student and says “Elephant”, the student must put one hand on his nose and the other arm through the hole his other arm is making (so it looks like an elephant trunk) and then make and elephant noise. The two students to his left and right must use both their arms to make elephant ears.
  4. Another layer, would be if the teacher pointed to a student and said “Jello”, the student being pointed at would have to wiggle around like jello (and make Jello noises) while the students on the left and right would put their arms around the jello to make the bowl.
  5. The final layer, is if the teacher points at a student and says “Godzilla” than the student must stomp in place and roar as if he was Godzilla while the student on the left and right must cower and scream.
  6. If you have time, you can add more in.
  7. Finally, if the class is getting the hang of the game and is able to go faster and faster, then you can add another twist. If one student messes up or does not do his/her action quick enough then they go into the middle of the circle and is now the one pointing out the actions.

Concerns:

  • There are many elements to this game and it could be difficult for some students to remember all of them.
  • The more complex this game gets, the older the student would need to be. I would say this game is for middle-school students and up.
  • This game might need to be altered for some handicap students.
  • Finally, this game could be a little noisy so making sure that you are in a environment that it would not be distracting is important. If the game is to loud, sticking to the quieter pantomimes is a good idea.

Source: 

High school drama teacher, Marilyn Markano, and on the website artswork.asu.edu.

Looking for more unique drama ideas?  Check out Beat by beat Press, a new publisher of musical plays for kids.

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